Taiwan, Trade, Technology: Explaining the US-China Competition in the New Era

Welcome to follow our real-time report on the meeting between President Biden and Chinese leader Xi Jinping.
No relationship can affect the development of the earth more than it. No relationship is filled with more tension and distrust on such a broad and important issue.
The United States and China have serious differences on how to manage the people and the economy. Both of these big powers compete for influence overseas, compete in technology, and seek military superiority in land, space, and cyberspace. But the two countries are also major trading and business partners, which makes the competition between the United States and China very different and more complicated from the competition during the Cold War, although the two are compared from time to time.
This complexity will be fully reflected when President Biden and China’s top leader Xi Jinping hold a video meeting.

U.S. Secretary of State Blincol described the handling of relations with China as “the greatest geopolitical test of the 21st century.” But since Mao Zedong’s army took control of the country in 1949 (the CCP’s phrase is “liberated”), China has been a headache for American policymakers.
In the decades after the founding of New China, the CCP once pushed the economy to ruin. The government later changed its policy, and China became richer and richer. Now, Xi Jinping, who has been China’s leader since 2013, wants to restore China’s supremacy in the global order.
US Secretary of State Blincoln and President Biden. Brinken called the handling of relations with China “the biggest geopolitical test of the 21st century.”
US Secretary of State Blincoln and President Biden. Brinken called the handling of relations with China “the biggest geopolitical test of the 21st century.” PETE MAROVICH FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
“Recognize the general trend of rising east and falling west,” Xi Jinping said.
The following are the main aspects that define competition in this era.
Competing for the dominance of the Pacific Rim
Since the end of World War II, the United States has been using its sea and air power to maintain order throughout the Pacific. This is not a situation that China will accept for a long time.

As China strengthens its military presence in the region, the Biden administration seeks to expand US alliances with Australia, Japan, India, and other countries. Beijing regards these practices as dangerous provocations in order to maintain the “hegemony” of the United States.
A major potential flashpoint is Taiwan. Taiwan is a democratic and autonomous island that is regarded as Chinese territory by the CCP. Xi Jinping has vowed to realize the “great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation,” which includes bringing Taiwan under Chinese control. China has sent more and more fighter jets into the airspace near Taiwan, an unabashed reminder that China has never ruled out the possibility of annexing Taiwan by force.
A picture displayed by Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense. The picture shows a Chinese H-6. The date of the picture is unknown.
A picture displayed by Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense. The picture shows a Chinese H-6. The date of the picture is unknown. TAIWAN MINISTRY OF NATIONAL DEFENSE
For a long time, successive US presidents have been unclear on the issue of how much force the United States will use to defend Taiwan. This “strategic ambiguity” is to avoid angering Beijing and to signal that Taiwan should not have the idea of ​​relying on the United States if it considers declaring independence.
Nevertheless, the administrations of current President Biden and former President Trump have strengthened their support for Taiwan. American warships pass through the Taiwan Strait. There is a small group of American troops training with the Taiwan army.
When asked in October this year whether the United States would protect Taiwan, Biden said bluntly, “Yes, we promised to do that.”
The White House quickly stated that Biden’s statement does not represent a change in US policy.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *